Design I // Stop Motion Animation Final

For Design I’s final project, we focused on time and motion. With technology speeding ahead these days, it is beneficial to challenge students to try this as a school project.

Students had to produce a one-minute stop motion animation consisting of photography and sound. Creativity wise, the sky was the limit! The best video-editing software available to them were Apple iMovie and Windows Movie Maker. The more frames per second that were compiled, the smoother the video appeared. To put this into perspective, the Wallace & Gromit 30-minute shorts were shot close to 20 frames per second, adding up to be around 35,000 shots per video. That’s a bit extreme for my students, so they were encouraged to place at least two frames per second. We also watched short films by Disney and Tim Burton, and the hilarious YouTube classic “Marcel the Shell with Shoes On“.

It was a challenge for students to work on an art project of this scale, especially if they were new to Apple iMovie & Windows Movie Maker video-editing software. However, they were very proud of themselves for figuring out such a feat. We had a lot of fun in both sections eating snacks and watching everyone’s videos, and celebrating the end of another school year!

Below are some examples of what was submitted. So turn up your audio and be entertained by these one-minute shorts!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

2 sections:

Ashley Baker

 

Lexi Bennett

 

Cassidy Jones

 

Taylor Robbins

 

Taylor Vaughn

 

Mary Beth McClung

 

Landen Rucker

 

Breanna Rochelle

 

Paige Davis

 

Wes Edgeworth

 

Forrest Beasley

 

Willie Griffin

 

Laken Beasley

 

Jacob Ingram

 

Bess Reilly

 

Zac Varner

Intro to Computing // Impossible Reality

For my students’ first Photoshop project, I wanted them to think outside the box and create an “Impossible Reality”. They had to gather their original photography and make new photos as needed to compose their surreal image. The main artist of inspiration was Eric Johansson. He is an incredible Photoshop artist, but also kind enough to post photos and videos to demonstrate his entire process, which is great for beginners to see. Like Eric, they needed to produce an image that tricks the eye to appear realistic.

Below are some examples that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

Carson-Brantley_impossible-reality

by Carson Brantley

Elizabeth_Gammill-Impossible_Reality

by Elizabeth Gammill

Huner Smith

by Hunter Smith

Jacquelyn_Mullins_Impossible_Reality

by Tori Mullins

Julia-Thompson_impossible-reality

by Julia Thompson

Shannon-Shepherd_Impossible-Reality

by Shannon Shepherd

Whitney-White_impossible-reality-Rgb

by Whitney White

Intro to Computing // Impossible Reality

Fall 2016: For my students’ first Photoshop project, I wanted them to think outside the box and create an “Impossible Reality”. They had to gather their original photography and make new photos as needed to compose their surreal image. The main artist of inspiration was Eric Johansson. He is an incredible Photoshop artist, but also kind enough to post photos and videos to demonstrate his entire process, which is great for beginners to see. Like Eric, they needed to produce an image that tricks the eye to appear realistic.

Below are some examples that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

section1_bryce-sheasby_impossible-reality

by Bryce Sheasby

section1_hannah-livingston_impossible-reality

by Hannah Livingston

section1_kaitlyn-upton_impossible-reality

by Kaitlyn Upton

section3_brittany-riland_impossible-reality

by Brittany Riland

section3_gerald-wicks_impossible-reality

by Gerald Wicks

section3_olivia-ketchum_impossible-reality

by Olivia Ketchum

section4_alice-hanson_impossible-reality

by Allie Hanson

section4_anngray-flowers_impossiblereality

by Ann Gray Flowers

section4_canaan-griffin_impossible-reality2

by Canaan Griffin

section4_ques-nevels_impossible-reality

by Ques Nevels

Design I // Stop Motion Animation Final

For my Spring 2016 Design I class, I decided to do something different for their final project to focus on time and motion. When I was a graduate student and instructor of record at Louisiana Tech University, my Basic Design class produced stop motion animation films for their final project. With technology speeding ahead these days, I thought it was time to bring this project to Mississippi State University.

Students had to produce a one-minute stop motion animation consisting of photography and sound. Creativity wise, the sky was the limit! The best video-editing software available to them were Apple iMovie and Windows Movie Maker. The more frames per second that were compiled, the smoother the video appeared. To put this into perspective, the Wallace & Gromit 30-minute shorts were shot close to 20 frames per second, adding up to be around 35,000 shots per video. That’s a bit extreme for my students, so they were encouraged to place at least two frames per second. We also watched short films by Disney and Tim Burton, and the hilarious YouTube classic “Marcel the Shell with Shoes On“.

It was a challenge for students to work on an art project of this scale, especially if they were new to video-editing software. However, they were very proud of themselves for figuring out such a feat. We had a lot of fun in both sections eating snacks and watching everyone’s videos, and celebrating the end of another school year!

Below are some examples of what was submitted. So turn up your audio and be entertained by these one-minute shorts!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

Mimi Sheppard

 

AK-Russell

 

Jeremy Hamilton, "Brains"

 

Emory Endicott

 

Malik Henley

 

Mary Hannah Ruff, "Words"

 

Anna Katherine Surholt

 

Gabrielle Martinez

 

Elizabeth Costa

 

Kyle Murphy

 

Olivia Williams

Design I // Value

For Design I’s fifth project, we focused on value. Students chose a photograph, magazine picture, or calendar photo, and were challenged to extract color from your chosen area, leaving only value. They painted 20–25% of the photo with acrylics in greys, following the original values so closely that the area logically fit within the unpainted, colored area. This challenge was much like a “paint-by-number” activity. If a well-done solution is photographed or Xeroxed in black and white, it should be hard to distinguish the area painted in greys from the original.

Below are some of the pieces that were submitted. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

by April Porter

by April Porter

by Caroline Caliva

by Caroline Caliva

Jenn McFadden

Jenn McFadden

by Jessica Moore

by Jessica Moore

by Lauren Roberts

by Lauren Roberts

by Tuesdai Johnson

by Tuesdai Johnson