Intro to Computing // Creature Cartoon GIF

As an added continuation of their first Creature Cartoon project done in Adobe Illustrator, I challenged my students to turn it into a GIF after we started learning Photoshop. There are many ways to make a GIF, but in my research I found it was best to form their creature in Illustrator, and pull the file into Photoshop to put it into action.

I posted my own Part I and Part II tutorial YouTube videos demonstrating the steps on my laptop screen so students could reference them outside of class to produce their own GIF.

Students had to implement at least 3 actions in their GIF to receive full credit– for example eyes blinking, arms moving, and feet tapping. The number of frames they incorporated depended on their actions and how many they personally needed to see the actions to smooth completion.

It was so fun seeing these little guys and gals come to life!

Below are some GIFs that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results.

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

by Carson Brantley: anxious, fly, antlers ^

by Elizabeth Gammill:  crawl, giggly, long tail ^

by Shannon Shepherd: big feet, running, sad ^

by Grayson Brown: mellow, shell, exercise ^

by Whitney White: afraid, mane, sleeping ^

by Madison Wigginton: calm, short legs, smell flower ^

by Mary Hannah Ruff: long arms, upside down, bashful ^

by Caylee Hubbard: squishy cheeks, happy, climbing ^

 

Intermediate Computing for Design // Nature Posters + Blufish Visit

The fourth project for Intermediate Computing for Design class was to create two poster designs for a fictional lecture called “Nature as Design.” One had to be done using Illustrator, and the other using Photoshop and InDesign. The challenge was to design two posters that have a cohesive, complimentary style and will catch the public’s eye. Using different software to create the same effect for different posters also helped inform the students the differences between the programs’ capabilities.

This project was their first project dealing with typography. Students were also required to print their designs on special textural and/or colored paper ordered online. Most students chose to order from Neenah or French. As this was their first time printing on paper other than Epson, they had to make adjustments in relation to image color and contrast.

Below are photographs of posters that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

DSC_6282

by Laura Leigh Hicks, cream paper

DSC_6285

by Laura Leigh Hicks, cream paper

DSC_6289

by Connor Booth, white dimpled paper

DSC_6293

by Connor Booth, white dimpled paper

DSC_6297

by Gerald Wicks, cream speckle-toned paper

DSC_6302

by Gerald Wicks, cream speckle-toned paper

DSC_6306

by Bethany Smith, pink speckle-toned paper

DSC_6309

by Bethany Smith, pink speckle-toned paper

DSC_6315

by Kate Webb, silvery pearl paper

DSC_6264b

by Cara Moore, cream linen paper

DSC_6266

by Cara Moore, cream linen paper

DSC_6268

by Carly Bond, cream dimpled paper

DSC_6271

by Carly Bond, cream dimpled paper

DSC_6273

by Trent Furr, green speckle-toned paper

DSC_6276

by Trent Furr, blue speckle-toned paper

Also a big thanks to Blufish design studio in Starkville, MS for allowing my class to tour their firm, learn about their business, what to expect in the workplace outside of school, and ask questions. It was a delightful, informative visit!

IMG_1162

Intro to Computing Art // OMG American Gods

For students to refine their skills using Adobe Illustrator’s Pen Tool, my students accepted the challenge of the OMG project, as in “Oh my gosh, this is so challenging and time consuming!” But the effort is well worth the outcome.

The theme was to recreate a god or goddess in modern society. Students researched Greek, Roman, and Aztec mythological figures to learn about their core characteristics, and brainstormed how to apply them in our current culture.

They photographed themselves, friends, or family as their models. Then they used that photo as a template to make a vector illustration in Adobe Illustrator.  Tiny solid shapes make up the entirety of the photo to make a realistic representation.  They spent about three weeks on the project. The process is like creating a digital painting! Below are some examples that were turned in. I also included the outline imagery of a couple illustrations to show the number of shapes that were created to make up the compositions. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results! These illustrations are sure to blow your mind!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

Print

Aditi by Madison Wigginton

Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 3.49.17 PM

(Outline of shapes)

Carson_Brantley_americangods_hera

Hera by Carson Brantley

Caylee_Hubbard_gods_venus

Venus by Caylee Hubbard

Apollopp

Apollo by Darren Cheairs

Print

Hecate by Elizabeth Gammill

Grayson Brown_American Gods_Athena

Athena by Grayson Brown

American Gods

Loki by Rebecca Bailey

Print

Apollo by Whitney White

Intermediate Computing for Design // Reinterpret a Cliché

The third project for Intermediate Computing for Design class was called Reinterpret a Cliché. Imagery seen too frequently is often not seen at all. This is the case with overused design symbols and everyday objects. Overuse renders them ineffective, and they lose their power to communicate. It is the function of the designer to revitalize these clichéd symbols and objects by interpreting them in individual and personal ways.

Students picked 6 of the following 12 examples of typically clichéd objects to be reinterpreted:

  1. Heart
  2. Key
  3. Apple
  4. Sun
  5. Stars
  6. Mouth
  7. Light Bulb
  8. Tree
  9. Cloud
  10. Eye
  11. Rose
  12. Nuts & Bolts

Then they chose a theme all 6 illustrations would have in common. Not only were they to work stylistically, but conceptually, as well. The final product had to be black & white. They scanned their sketchbook designs into Photoshop or Illustrator to continue rendering them to completion, either using the Pen Tool or Live Trace option.

Below are some designs that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

bethany-smith

by Bethany Smith; insects

cara-moore

by Cara Moore; flowers

carly-bond

by Carly Bond; fairy-tales

connor-booth

by Connor Booth; under the sea

gerald-wicks

by Gerald Wicks; Harry Potter

imani-smith

by Imani Smith; dancers

ques-nevels

by Ques Nevels; fighters

sarah-ferguson

by Sarah Ferguson; fruits & veggies

stephen-latham

by Stephen Latham; bit-syle Mario characters

taylor-knight

by Taylor Knight; stereotypes

lauraleigh-hicks

by Laura Leigh Hicks; facial hair

Intro to Computing // Creature Cartoon

In Intro to Computing, students learn the basics of Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. This Spring semester, I teach one section of the class. During the Fall it is primarily students who are trying out for the graphic design program in November, but during the Spring it is mostly fine art students who are taking the class as an elective.

This is the second semester I have implemented this project as an introduction to Adobe Illustrator. For Creature Cartoon, each student pulled words out of separate bags– one for a physical trait, one for an action, and one for an emotion. The end goal is to illustrate a unique creature that accompanies all these traits successfully in Illustrator.

After receiving their words, students brainstormed and submitted a series of thumbnails of their ideas, which were then narrowed down to their top three when I visited them in class one-on-one. Those three were turned into well-drawn comps that were drawn with Sharpies and Micron pens, and critiqued by their entire class. The best drawing was scanned into Illustrator, and vector shapes were placed on top. The focus of this Illustrator project was learning the Pen Tool and conducting organized layer management.

For even MORE fun, my students will turn their illustrations into animated GIFs when we start the Photoshop segment. Stay tuned to see those later this semester!

Below are some illustrations that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

Carson-Brantley_Creature_AnixousFlyAntlers

by Carson Brantley: anxious, fly, antlers

Elizabeth-Gammill_Creature_crawlgigglylongtail

by Elizabeth Gammill: crawl, giggly, long tail

Monster Illustration

by Grayson Brown: mellow, shell, exercise

Basic RGB

by Jacquelyn Mullins: bored, whiskers, jumping

Print

by Shannon Shepherd: big feet, running, sad

Whitney_White_Creature_AfraidManeCurledAsleep

by Whitney White: afraid, mane, asleep

UPDATE: See GIFs created later during the semester here.

Intro to Computing // Creature Cartoon GIF

Fall 2016: As an added continuation of their first Creature Cartoon project done in Adobe Illustrator, I challenged my students to turn it into a GIF after we started learning Photoshop. There are many ways to make a GIF, but in my research I found it was best to form their creature in Illustrator, and pull the file into Photoshop to put it into action.

Since I had not made a GIF before, I had my own homework in figuring this out so I could teach my students. I read and watched many demos until I found a system that seemed to work well. I even recorded and posted my own Part I and Part II tutorial YouTube videos demonstrating the steps on my laptop screen so students could reference them outside of class to produce their own GIF.

Students had to implement at least 3 actions in their GIF to receive full credit– for example eyes blinking, arms moving, and feet tapping. The number of frames they incorporated depended on their actions and how many they personally needed to see the actions to smooth completion.

It was so fun seeing these little guys and gals come to life!

Below are some GIFs that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results.

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

by Kaitlyn Upton: angry, fly, whiskers ^

by Josie Goodman: squishy cheeks, joyful, upside down ^

by Mary Emily Moore: big eyes, broken-hearted, eat ^

by Ques Nevels: grumpy, webbed feet, skate ^

by Meredith Morris: tentacles, mellow, float ^

by Ashley Rude: curious, climb, short legs ^

by April Porter: webbed feet, anxious, float ^

by Gerald Wicks: excited, climbing, long tail ^

by Ryan Guillory: horns, exercise, lazy ^

by Brittany Riland: mad, long arms, swing ^

by Laura Leigh Hicks: squishy cheeks, afraid, smell flower ^

by Olivia Ketchum: happy, sharp teeth, read ^

by Morgan Helton:  beak, sleepy, read ^

 

Intro to Computing Art // OMG American Gods

Fall 2016: For students to refine their skills using Adobe Illustrator’s Pen Tool, my students accepted the challenge of the OMG project, as in “Oh my gosh, this is so challenging and time consuming!” But the effort is well worth the outcome.

In the past the theme has been to recreate a movie scene.  This semester to mix things up, the theme was to recreate a god or goddess in modern society. Students researched Greek, Roman, and Aztec mythological figures to learn about their core characteristics, and brainstormed how to apply them in our current culture.

They photographed themselves, friends, or family as their models. Then they used that photo as a template to make a vector illustration in Adobe Illustrator.  Tiny solid shapes make up the entirety of the photo to make a realistic representation.  They spent about three weeks on the project. The process is like creating a digital painting! Below are some examples that were turned in. I also included the outline imagery of a couple illustrations to show the number of shapes that were created to make up the compositions. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results! These illustrations are sure to blow your mind!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

Americangods

Huitzilopochtli by Moesha Wright

screen-shot-2017-01-12-at-10-34-26-am

(Outline of shapes)

Print

Apollo by Allie Hanson

screen-shot-2017-01-12-at-10-33-19-am

(Outline of shapes)

Section1_Kaitlyn-Upton_Poseidon copy

Poseidon by Kaitlyn Upton

03_April_Porter_Aeolus

Aeolus by April Porter

aphrodite [Recovered].ailast

Aphrodite by Bethany Smith

Section3_Gerald-Wicks_Dionysus

Dionysus by Gerald Wicks

section03_maryemily-moore_Karpo

Karpo by Mary Emily Moore

Section3_Parker-Webb_Hephaestus

Hephaestus by Parker Webb

Print

Dionysus by Ryan Guillory

Section4_Canaan-Griffin_GodnessHekate

Hekate by Canaan Griffin

Hermes

Hermes by Josie Goodman

Print

Ninkasi by Meredith Morris

S4_morgan_helton_demeter

Demeter by Morgan Helton

Aphrodite

Aphrodite by Taylor Knight

Intro to Computing Art // Creature Cartoon

Fall 2016: In Intro to Computing, students learn the basics of Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. In the past, their first project was creating an illustration based on an idiom in Illustrator. It was time to retire that project for awhile and try something new that challenged fresh ideas. This semester, I teach 3 sections of Intro to Computing for a total of about 40 students.

I am proud to admit that this new project was something I conceived on my own! For Creature Cartoon, each student pulled words out of separate bags– one for a physical trait, one for an action, and one for an emotion. Then they had to illustrate a unique creature that accompanied all those traits successfully in Illustrator.

After receiving their words, students brainstormed and submitted a series of thumbnails of their ideas, which were then narrowed down to their top three when I visited them in class one-on-one. Those three were turned into well-drawn comps that were drawn with Sharpies and Micron pens, and critiqued by their entire class. The best drawing was scanned into Illustrator, and vector shapes were placed on top. The focus of this Illustrator project was learning the Pen Tool and conducting organized layer management.

For even MORE fun, my students turned their illustrations into animated GIFs when we started the Photoshop segment. See how the GIFs turned out HERE.

Below are some illustrations that were turned in. All have aspects to be improved upon for their portfolio, but overall I was very pleased with their results!

* I have permission from my students to promote their work on my website.

section1_andrea-osby_creature_joyfulshellsmellflower_marley-01

by Andrea Osby: joyful, shell, smell flower

section1_ashley-rude_creature_curiusclimbshortlegs_sticky-01

by Ashley Rude: curious, climb, short legs

section1_austin-smith_creature_bashfulantlersupsidedowngiraffaconstrictor-01

by Austin Smith: bashful, antlers, upside down

section1_hannah-livingston_creature_boredtalkingonphonesharpteeth_wesleye-01

by Hannah Livingston: bored, talking on the phone, sharp teeth

section1_kaitlyn-upton_creature_angryflywhiskers_melvin-01

by Kaitlyn Upton: angry, fly, whiskers

section3_april-porter_creature_webbedfeetanxiousfloat_sail-01

by April Porter: webbed feet, anxious, float

section3_bethany-smith-creature-surprisedflybeak-geegle-01

by Bethany Smith: surprised, fly, beak

section3_brittany-riland_creature_madlongarmsswing_uggo-01

by Brittany Riland: mad, long arms, swing

section3_christopher-gates_creature_singshortlegsgiggle_songster-01

by Chris Gates: sing, short legs, giggle

section3_gerald-wicks_creature_excitedclimbinglongtail_scansorialsaurus-01

by Gerald Wicks: excited, climbing, long tail

section3_laurahicks_creature_squishycheeksafraidsmellingflowers_beedo-01

by Laura Leigh Hicks: squishy cheeks, afraid, smell flower

section3_maryemilymoore_creature_bigeyesbrokenheartedeat_fuzzler-01

by Mary Emily Moore: big eyes, broken-hearted, eat

section3_olivia-kethum_creature_happysharpteethread_triroceros-01

by Olivia Ketchum: happy, sharp teeth, read

section3_ryan-guillory_creature_hornsexerciselazy_grumbalodile-01

by Ryan Guillory: horns, exercise, lazy

section4_alice-hanson_creature_longarmscalmunicycle_granola-01

by Allie Hanson: long arms, calm, unicycle

section4_anngray_flowers_creature_maneboringsmellflowers_flowerchild_ai-01

by Ann Gray Flowers: mane, bored, smell flowers

section4_josie_goodman_creature_squishycheeksjoyfulupsidedown_wild_chimahusky-copy-01

by Josie Goodman: squishy cheeks, joyful, upside down

section4_meredithmorris_creature_tentaclesfloatingmellow-01

by Meredith Morris: tentacles, mellow, float

section4_morgan-helton_creature_beaksleepyread_karen-01

by Morgan Helton: beak, sleepy, read

section4_ques-nevels_creature_grumpywebbedskate_solestealer-01

by Ques Nevels: grumpy, webbed feet, skate

section4_sarah-ferguson_creature_sadjumpingshell_sheela-01

by Sarah Ferguson: sad, jumping, shell

section4_taylor-knight_creature_bigearsbashfuleating_rosie-01

by Taylor Knight: big ears, bashful, eat

UPDATE: See GIFs created later during the semester here.

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